Nominees for BioOne Ambassador Award

The Auk and The Condor have each nominated a recent author for BioOne’s inaugural Ambassador Award, which will recognize “early career authors working to communicate the importance and impact of their focused research to communities beyond their fields of expertise.” Each of up to five winners will receive a $1000 cash award. More information can be found on BioOne’s website.

The Auk has nominated Emily Williams, lead author of the recent paper Patterns and correlates of within-season breeding dispersal: A common strategy in a declining grassland songbird (press release).

The Condor has nominated Andrew Dennhardt, lead author of the paper Applying citizen-science data and mark–recapture models to estimate numbers of migrant Golden Eagles in an Important Bird Area in eastern North America (press release).

We wish Emily and Andrew luck as the selection process for the awards continues!

Are Flamingos Returning to Florida?

CONDOR-17-187 J Patterson

American Flamingos should be considered native to Florida, argue the authors of a new review. Photo credit: J. Patterson

Flamingos are a Florida cultural icon, and sightings of American Flamingos in the state have been on the rise in recent decades. However, whether they’re truly native to the U.S. or only arrive via escape from captivity has long been subject to debate, making developing a plan for managing Florida’s flamingo population challenging. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications reviews the evidence and provides a fresh argument that the birds should be considered part of the Sunshine State’s native fauna.

Zoo Miami’s Steven Whitfield, along with colleagues from Audubon Florida’s Everglades Science Center, the National Park Service, Big Cypress National Preserve, and the Rookery Bay Estuarine Research Reserve, reexamined the historical evidence of flamingos in Florida and evaluated the likely origins of birds seen in recent years. Overall, they conclude, the evidence from both narrative accounts and museum records suggests that American Flamingos once occurred naturally in large flocks in Florida and probably even nested there before being eliminated by hunting around 1900. From 1950 to the present, however, birdwatchers have reported almost 500 new observations of flamingos in Florida, with both flock size and the frequency of observations increasing over time. While it’s plausible that some of these individuals could be escapees from captive flocks, there is also strong evidence for dispersal from wild populations in Mexico and the Caribbean.

The population history Whitfield and his coauthors describe is consistent with that of some native species already protected by state and federal endangered species laws, and they hope that their study will lead to a better plan for managing wild flamingos in Florida. “Living in Florida, you see flamingos everywhere—in advertising, in place names, even on the logo for the state lottery—but as an actual organism, as a species, there was essentially no information available on the biology of flamingos,” says Whitfield. “Some biologists considered them native birds that were extirpated during the plume trade of the late 1800s, and urged for population recovery measures, while others considered the rare flamingos seen around Florida to be escapes from captive colonies. We often say that in south Florida we have just two types of species, introduced and endangered, but a species can’t be both at the same time.”

“This article finally sheds welcome light on status of these iconic birds in Florida. The authors meticulously researched historic records and compiled more recent sightings to reconstruct the history and population trends of flamingos in Florida,” adds the American Museum of Natural History’s Felicity Arengo, a flamingo conservation expert who was not involved in the study. “Flamingo numbers have increased notably since the 1950s due to protections to species and habitats in Florida and throughout the Caribbean. The authors are cautious and recognize the limitations of the data in their study, but they provide ample evidence that Florida was the northernmost extent of the American Flamingo prior to the early 1900s and that populations have been recovering.”

Status and trends of American Flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber) in Florida, USA is available at http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1650/CONDOR-17-187.1.

About the journal: The Condor: Ornithological Applications is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology. It began in 1899 as the journal of the Cooper Ornithological Club, a group of ornithologists in California that became the Cooper Ornithological Society, which merged with the American Ornithologists’ Union in 2016 to become the American Ornithological Society. In 2016, The Condor had the number one impact factor among 24 ornithology journals.

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Fracking Tied to Reduced Songbird Nesting Success

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A researcher handles a Louisiana Waterthrush chick. Photo credit: M. Frantz

The central Appalachian region is experiencing the country’s most rapid growth in shale gas development, or “fracking,” but we’ve known almost nothing about how this is affecting the region’s songbird populations—until now. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications demonstrates that the nesting success of the Louisiana Waterthrush—a habitat specialist that nests along forested streams, where the potential for habitat degradation is high—is declining at sites impacted by shale gas development in northwestern West Virginia.

West Virginia University’s Mack Frantz and his colleagues mapped waterthrush territories and monitored nests along 14 streams from 2009 to 2011 and again from 2013 to 2015. They also mapped and measured disturbances to streams and to the forest canopy, using aerial photographs and satellite imagery as well as extensive ground-truthing, and classifying them according to whether they were related to shale gas development. Their results show that as shale gas development has expanded in the area, nest survival and productivity and riparian habitat quality have declined. At the same time, the size of individual waterthrush territories has increased, suggesting birds need to range farther to find sufficient resources. This study is one of the first to demonstrate that shale gas development can affect songbird reproductive success and productivity, both directly through the presence of fracking infrastructure and indirectly through effects on habitat quality.

“I hope our findings lead to robust protections of our forested headwater stream ecosystems, which are currently overlooked for regulation despite their critical role in providing nutrients and organic matter downstream, not to mention as an important source for drinking water,” says Frantz. “Waterthrushes are a modern-day ‘canary in the coal mine,’ and there are many more opportunities to study how anthropogenic disturbance affects and entangles food webs at the aquatic–terrestrial interface.”

“After twelve years of research conducted with this species, I have seen the numerous impacts hydraulic fracturing has had on waterthrush survival and the toll that the industry has had on our nation’s wild places and wildlife,” adds Louisiana State University-Alexandria’s Leesia Marshall, a waterthrush expert who was not involved in the Condor study. “This paper should serve as a call for all scientists to redouble efforts across all related disciplines to document the present impacts of shale gas extraction and to develop strategies for mitigation and avoidance of potential impacts in the future.”

Demographic response of Louisiana Waterthrush, a stream obligate songbird of conservation concern, to shale gas development is available at http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1650/CONDOR-17-130.1.

About the journal: The Condor: Ornithological Applications is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology. It began in 1899 as the journal of the Cooper Ornithological Club, a group of ornithologists in California that became the Cooper Ornithological Society, which merged with the American Ornithologists’ Union in 2016 to become the American Ornithological Society. In 2016, The Condor had the number one impact factor among 24 ornithology journals.

Endangered Woodpeckers Persist, but Still Struggle, on Private Land

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Red-cockaded Woodpeckers nesting on private land continue to face challenges. Photo credit: B. Beck

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service started the Safe Harbor program in North Carolina in 1995 to reduce conflict between landowners and conservation officials and to encourage private landowners to take steps to benefit endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers on their land. The program has successfully reduced conflict over conservation and reduced the abandonment of nest clusters, but a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications shows that while the program may have raised landowners’ awareness of and tolerance for their feathered neighbors, it has largely failed to improve breeding success of birds on private lands.

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University’s Jennifer Smith and her colleagues compared Red-cockaded Woodpeckers’ breeding success on Safe Harbor properties before and after enrollment with that on control properties, monitoring a total of 55 breeding clusters in the North Carolina Sandhills between 1980 and 2014. Nest cluster abandonment increased on control properties while remaining constant and negligible on Safe Harbor properties, but other measures of breeding success such as clutch size, nest failure rates, and fledging success were unaffected by Safe Harbor habitat management efforts. These results suggest that the Safe Harbor program often failed to maintain or increase high-quality foraging habitat for the birds.

Regular fires are essential for maintaining high-quality Red-cockaded Woodpecker habitat, and prescribed burns are not feasible on a large proportion of Safe Harbor properties in the Sandhills due to their proximity to residential areas. In addition, the researchers believe that inadequate funding may have limited the Safe Harbor program’s impact. However, they believe the program and the monitoring efforts that have accompanied it still have value. “The longevity of the research project combined with the initiation of Safe Harbor has had marked benefits because it has allowed us to build relationships with private landowners,” says Kerry Brust, co-author of the paper. “Exchanges with private landowners have presented an ideal opportunity to draw attention to the listed species and the management needed for the persistence of Red-cockaded Woodpeckers.”

“This study identifies the great value that Safe Harbor has brought to Red-cockaded Woodpecker conservation but also highlights important and daunting limitations of the program,” according to U.S. Forest Service biologist John Kilgo, who works on Red-cockaded Woodpecker conservation and was not involved in the study. “As these are primarily related to funding constraints and less stringent habitat management requirements under the program, new and creative approaches will be required if the effectiveness of Safe Harbor is to be improved.”

How effective is the Safe Harbor program for the conservation of Red-cockaded Woodpeckers? is available at http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1650/CONDOR-17-113.1.

About the journal: The Condor: Ornithological Applications is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology. It began in 1899 as the journal of the Cooper Ornithological Club, a group of ornithologists in California that became the Cooper Ornithological Society, which merged with the American Ornithologists’ Union in 2016 to become the American Ornithological Society. In 2016, The Condor had the number one impact factor among 24 ornithology journals.

Timing of Spring Birdsong Provides Climate Insights

CONDOR-17-165 M McGrann

Hermit Warblers are among the species monitored for a new study of the timing of spring birdsong. Photo credit: M. McGrann

Climate change has scientists worried that birds’ annual migration and reproduction will be thrown out of sync with the seasons. Because birds’ songs are correlated with their breeding behavior and are easily identifiable to species, monitoring birdsong can be a good way to keep tabs on this possibility, and a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications takes advantage of this approach to provide new baseline data for the birds of northern California.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife Brett Furnas and William Jessup University’s Michael McGrann analyzed data from two bird survey programs from California’s Klamath Mountains and Southern Cascades, both of which used automated recorders to monitor bird sounds between 2009 and 2011. In addition to providing the first comprehensive assessment of songbird occupancy over a 40,000 square kilometer region of northern California, they were able to identify the precise dates of peak vocal activity for eight songbird species, and their work shows that this will be a feasible method to track advances in the timing of vocal activity over the coming decades. Species characterized by strong single peaks in vocal activity already tended to reach those peaks later than other species, perhaps because birds with tightly constrained timing are less able to adapt to changing climatic conditions.

“Climate change is disrupting songbird populations, distributions, and breeding behaviors in our mountain ecosystems. Mountains are particularly sensitive because temperature and precipitation interact in complex ways on mountains,” says McGrann. “If Neotropical migrants are unable to adjust their breeding behaviors, then there may be a mismatch in the timing of raising their young to the peak availability in food resources, namely insects. Our technique should allow us to track shifts in elevation, changes in the state of the population, and changes in breeding behaviors in response to climate change over the next ten to twenty years.”

“Furnas and McGrann provide a textbook example of how to detect differences in the timing of nesting among bird species using information on the peak date of singing derived from surveys and automated recorders,” according to UC Berkeley’s Steve Beissinger, an expert on avian phenology who was not involved in the study. “Their results support recent findings of a five to twelve day shift forward in the timing of peak singing by California birds in the nearby Sierra Nevada and coastal ranges in response to climate change.”

Using occupancy modeling to monitor dates of peak vocal activity for passerines in California is available at http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1650/CONDOR-17-165.1.

About the journal: The Condor: Ornithological Applications is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology. It began in 1899 as the journal of the Cooper Ornithological Club, a group of ornithologists in California that became the Cooper Ornithological Society, which merged with the American Ornithologists’ Union in 2016 to become the American Ornithological Society. In 2016, The Condor had the number one impact factor among 24 ornithology journals.

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Engineered Sandbars Don’t Measure Up for Nesting Plovers

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Piping Plovers were more successful nesting on natural sandbars than engineered ones. Photo credit: D. Borden

Dams alter rivers in ways that reduce the creation of natural sandbars, which is bad news for threatened Piping Plovers that depend on them for nesting habitat. Between 2004 and 2009, more than 200 hectares of engineered sandbars were built along the Missouri River to address the problem—but how does this engineered habitat compare to the real thing? A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications takes advantage of a natural experiment created by the region’s 2011 floods, demonstrating that the engineered habitat doesn’t provide the benefits of sandbars created by nature.

Kelsi Hunt of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and her colleagues collected data downstream of Gavins Point Dam from 2005 to 2014, monitoring more than 1,000 nests and banding almost 3,000 individual birds both before and after massive floods in 2011 created vast new areas of natural sandbar habitat. Nest success, chick survival, and total reproductive output all increased after the flood and remained high as flood-created sandbars began to age, even without the intensive predator management that had been done on the engineered sandbars. In contrast, Piping Plover populations nesting on engineered sandbars grew in the first year after the habitat’s construction, but there wasn’t enough space to go around—high population densities quickly led to high risk from predators and decreased reproductive rates.

“I realized just how interesting of a natural experiment the flood provided us with when my advisor and I boated the entirety of the Gavins Point Reach prior to the 2012 field season,” says Hunt. “The amount of sandbar habitat that the 2011 flood created was incredible to see. Where before there was just river, huge sandbars replaced it. Some of the sandbars it created were larger than city blocks and took hours to survey.” She hopes that managers can learn from this study to create better engineered habitat for sandbar-nesting birds, building more nesting space at one time and constructing new habitat close to existing sandbars so that young birds will have an easy time finding and colonizing it.

“This paper presents a clear contrast in demographic rates of Piping Plovers in naturally created and human-restored habitats that can be used to compare and refine conservation strategies,” adds Anne Hecht, Piping Plover recovery coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “Although it focuses on Missouri River sandbars, it has important implications for conservation of Piping Plover habitat rangewide, as well as for other species experiencing disruption of habitat formation processes.”

Demographic response of Piping Plovers suggests that engineered habitat restoration is no match for natural riverine processes is available at http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1650/CONDOR-17-93.1.

About the journal: The Condor: Ornithological Applications is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology. It began in 1899 as the journal of the Cooper Ornithological Club, a group of ornithologists in California that became the Cooper Ornithological Society, which merged with the American Ornithologists’ Union in 2016 to become the American Ornithological Society. In 2016, The Condor had the number one impact factor among 24 ornithology journals.

AUTHOR BLOG: Understanding How Management Affects a Flagship Reed Bed Bird Species

Thomas Oliver Mérő

Linked paper: Reed management influences philopatry to reed habitats in the Great Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) by T.O. Mérő, A. Žuljević, K. Varga, and S. Lengyel, The Condor: Ornithological Applications 120:1, February 2018.

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A color-banded singing Great Reed Warbler male, April 2015.

Wetlands are inhabited by disproportionately large number of plants and animals and yet are among the most endangered habitats worldwide due to human-caused habitat loss and fragmentation. Ecologists and conservation biologists work hard on saving wetlands by using various techniques such as vegetation management (e.g. breaking up homogeneous reed beds), water regulation (e.g. maintaining a flood/drought cycle), or reintroduction of extinct species (e.g. cranes in the U.K.). Several recent studies have shown that the management of wetlands such as reed beds by controlling the water level and removing the vegetation by mowing, burning, or grazing can increase species richness and diversity; however, we know less about whether such management provides better conditions for survival and reproduction of single species whose presence is important to other species.

The Great Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) is an Old World, long-distance migrant bird that breeds in reed habitats of the Western Palearctic and winters in sub-Saharan Africa. In central Europe, the Great Reed Warbler is a widespread breeder inhabiting almost all types of reed habitats (ponds, marshes, canals etc.). Great Reed Warblers arrive in mid-April from their wintering grounds and stay until the end of breeding season in late July.

We have studied the breeding ecology of Great Reed Warblers in northern Serbia for eight years. The region hosts a nice array of wetland habitat types, ranging from oxbows of the Danube to small and large canals, and from sand and clay mining ponds to marshes in natural depressions. For our work, we distinguished six types of reed habitats based on our own observations and information from local water management companies. The six types, which differ in their shape, size, vegetation cover, and water regime, are mining ponds, marshes, large canals, and three classes of small canals.

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Although large canals are preferred by large-winged, probably high-quality, males for nesting, this habitat type provides suboptimal conditions for breeding due to high brood parasitism by Cuckoos; therefore, this habitat type likely functions as an ecological trap.

These wetlands are managed by reed mowing and burning, which led us to wonder how reed management influences the birds and other wetland animals. Specifically, we were interested in whether and how management influences the survival and reproduction of Great Reed Warblers, a flagship species of lowland wetlands in central Europe. Reed management by burning and mowing offered a good opportunity to study the responses of Great Reed Warblers in each of the reed habitat types. For example, we recognized early on that larger-winged, presumably higher-quality, males tend to occupy reed habitats with little management and deep, stable water, which are typically found along large canals.

We color-banded all individuals (both adults and hatch-year birds) from the beginning of our study and regularly checked all reed beds every year during the nesting season to explore potential differences in survival and reproduction of birds in the six reed habitats. We were also curious to find out how reed management and water availability influence survival and reproduction. We first analyzed data on survival and encounter probability that were collected over seven breeding seasons (2009-2015).

We found that the encounter probability of birds banded as hatch-year birds was higher in reed habitats with shallower water, while that of those banded as adults was higher in reed habitats with deeper water. These opposite relationships between hatch-year birds and adults may indicate that experienced adults occupy qualitatively better habitats, similarly to large-winged males (mentioned above). When data were analyzed separately for the sexes, we found that the encounter probability of males depended on variation in reed management and in water depth. In contrast, for females, encounter probability depended only on water depth, i.e. encounter probability increased with water depth. Furthermore, most of the adults and hatch-year birds returned to the reed habitat that they had been occupying initially, indicating that Great Reed Warblers display unexpectedly high fidelity to the reed habitat type they hatched in or bred in before.

How do these results translate to management recommendations? We all want the best possible management for the birds we admire and study. Evidence found in our study showed that reed management by mowing and/or burning influences return rates of juveniles and adult males and females in different ways. These results suggest that in practice, spatially variable reed management should be applied and water with varying depths should be maintained to maximize the return rates of Great Reed Warblers. This is often easier said than done. However, the multitude of reed habitats in our study and the good working relationships we developed with water management authorities and other stakeholders will allow more detailed, experimental studies of the influence of management and the allocation of optimal combinations of management for the benefit of wetland birds.