Improving “Silvopastures” for Bird Conservation

CONDOR-18-1 B Tarbox Black-crowned Antshrike

Black-crowned Antshrikes are among the insectivorous birds that forage less efficiently in silvopasture habitat. Photo credit: B. Tarbox

The adoption of “silvopastures”—incorporating trees into pastureland—can provide habitat for forest bird species and improve connectivity in landscapes fragmented by agriculture. But how do silvopastures measure up to natural forest habitat? New research from The Condor: Ornithological Applications shows that birds in silvopasture forage less efficiently than those in forest fragments but offers suggestions for how silvopasture habitat could be improved.

The University of Florida’s Bryan Tarbox and his colleagues observed the foraging and flocking behavior of insect-eating birds in silvopastures on farms in the Colombian Andes between 2013 and 2015. They found that silvopastures were less structurally complex than forest fragments, with fewer and smaller trees, a sparser understory, and less diversity of tree species. Birds in silvopastures attacked insects less often, were less selective about where they foraged, and were less likely to join mixed-species flocks. Flock members attacked prey more frequently than solitary birds in forest fragments, but not in silvopastures, suggesting that something about silvopasture habitat negated the benefits of joining a flock.

The results show that silvopasture habitat could be improved by managing for higher tree species diversity and greater structural complexity, but that preserving natural forest fragments in agricultural landscapes is also crucial. “I hope people don’t get the impression that our results mean silvopastures aren’t a good idea,” says Tarbox. “The existing literature makes it clear that silvopastures are beneficial for biodiversity conservation. I think the big takeaway here is the importance of getting to the details of how specific land uses impact particular species or functional groups, so that we can figure out the best regional configurations of land use, given the competing needs of wildlife and agriculture.”

“Protected areas alone will be insufficient to conserve biodiversity at global scales. Instead, we must find ways to safeguard species and ecosystems while also sustaining human communities and livelihoods that depend upon local resources,” according to Cornell University’s Amanda Rodewald, an expert on bird responses to human land use who was not involved with the research. “In their study of insectivorous forest birds, Tarbox and his colleagues report that Andean silvopastures provided low quality foraging habitats and, as such, may fail to support resident and migratory birds as well as forest fragments. Fortunately, the study points to several strategies, such as planting preferred tree species and creating specialized microhabitats, that can be implemented at local and regional scales to improve suitability of silvopastoral habitats for birds.”

Foraging ecology and flocking behavior of insectivorous forest birds inform management of Andean silvopastures for conservation is available at http://americanornithologypubs.org/doi/full/10.1650/CONDOR-18-1.1.

About the journal: The Condor: Ornithological Applications is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology, published by the American Ornithological Society. For the past two years, The Condor has had the number one impact factor among 27 ornithology journals.

Newly Identified African Bird Species Already in Trouble

CONDOR-18-28 J Engel L poenisis

A Mountain Sooty Boubou. Photo credit: J. Engel

Central Africa’s Albertine Rift region is a biodiversity hotspot consisting of a system of highlands that spans six countries. Recent studies have shown that the population of sooty bush-shrikes occupying the region’s mid-elevation forests is a distinct species, and new research from The Condor: Ornithological Applications reveals that this newly discovered species may already be endangered due to pressure from agricultural development.

The newly identified mid-elevation species has been dubbed Willard’s Sooty Boubou, as opposed to the previously recognized high-elevation species, the Mountain Sooty Boubou. The Field Museum’s Fabio Berzaghi (now with the CEA Laboratory for Sciences of Climate and Environment in France) and his colleagues used museum records and bird survey records to analyze the ecological niche occupied by each species, and their results confirm that there is very little overlap between the ranges of the two species—Willard’s Sooty Boubou is found at approximately 1200–1900 meters and the Mountain Sooty Boubou at 1800–3800 meters. In Burundi, Rwanda, and Uganda, 70% of the potential for Willard’s Sooty Boubou lies outside of protected areas and has been converted to agriculture, and the numbers for the Democratic Republic of Congo are only slightly better.

Willard’s Sooty Boubou joins several other imperiled bird species that depend on the region’s mid-elevation forests, which have been largely overlooked by conservation efforts. “The Albertine Rift is a crossroads of amazing biodiversity, dramatic and diverse landscapes, and heartbreaking social and political unrest. It goes from glaciers to volcanoes to plateaus to lakes, with a succession of vegetation types from high-elevation cloud forests to lowland tropical forests,” says Berzaghi. “It is home to gorillas and forest elephants as well as a high number of endemic animal and plant species. Unfortunately, much of the region has gone through never-ending conflicts, with very negative consequences for both humans and biodiversity, and conservation involving local populations is paramount.”

“This paper provides additional data in support of the recognition of Willard’s Sooty Boubou as a species distinct from Mountain Sooty Boubou. Clarification of the niche that Willard’s Sooty Boubou occupies, that of mid-elevation forests, distinct from the higher-elevation Mountain Sooty Boubou, is important, because these habitats are among the most heavily impacted in Africa from agriculture,” according to UC Berkeley’s Rauri Bowie, an expert on African birds who was not involved in the study. “Conservation agencies have an opportunity to move beyond taxonomic debate and use the models derived from this species to improve conservation outcomes for not only this species, but also a broad set of mid-elevation Albertine Rift endemic vertebrates through protection of mid-elevation forests that have received relatively little protection in comparison to high-elevation montane habitats.”

Comparative niche modeling of two bush-shrikes (Laniarius) and the conservation of mid-elevation Afromontane forests of the Albertine Rift is available at http://americanornithologypubs.org/doi/full/10.1650/CONDOR-18-28.1.

About the journal: The Condor: Ornithological Applications is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology, published by the American Ornithological Society. For the past two years, The Condor has had the number one impact factor among 27 ornithology journals.

AUTHOR BLOG: “Bird-in-the-middle”—a mid-elevation tropical species stuck in limbo

Fabio Berzaghi & John Bates

Linked paper: Comparative niche modeling of two bush-shrikes (Laniarius) and the conservation of mid-elevation Afromontane forests of the Albertine Rift by F. Berzaghi, J.E. Engel, A.J. Plumptre, H. Mugabe, D. Kujirakwinja, S. Ayebare, and J.M. Bates, The Condor: Ornithological Applications 120:4, October 2018.

Capture

A search through the tropical forest literature for “mid-elevation forests” reveals relatively few results compared to a search for high-elevation or lowland forests, and looking at a map of protected areas and land cover in mountainous tropical regions makes it clear why. For example, in the African Albertine Rift, most national parks tend to be in high elevation areas where slopes are steep and land conversion for human use is more difficult. As we move down the slopes, the habitat starts degrading until we arrive in the lowlands, where almost no intact habitat remains, particularly on the eastern side of the Rift.

In 2010, Voelker et al. described a new species of bush-strike, the Willard’s Sooty Boubou (Laniarius willardi), and noticed that this species occurs at lower elevations than its sister species, the Mountain Sooty Boubou (Lanarius poensis). We were thus wondering how much habitat was left for this mid-elevation species, knowing that in this region lower-elevation forests are degraded or have been converted to agriculture. Using niche modeling and land cover data, we discovered that these two species of birds reside at different elevations across a small portion of montane Africa, overlapping only in part. Unfortunately, the habitat for L. willardi has been greatly reduced, because mid-elevation forests are outside protected areas and national parks. L. willardi may not be able to move to higher elevations, as its preferred environmental conditions are between 1200 and 1900 meters; a large portion of its suitable habitat is found in the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s Itombwe Plateau, technically a protected area but problematic to protect.

The plight of L. willardi is probably similar to that of many other mid- and low-elevation species in the area. Even though our results are not such good news for birds and other mid-elevation species in the region, we also want to highlight the importance of scientific collaborations with local researchers and conservation units. These collaborations help us define habitats and species in need of attention. Importantly, the authors of our study are a combination of Africans and non-Africans, with a range of research foci including ornithology and conservation but also niche modeling and bioinformatics. The data used in our study are based on both museum specimens (historical and modern) and modern field observations, which were carried out by teams that always included African students and scientists from the countries where the data were collected. Conservation can only be successful in the long run if in-country capacity for conservation science is developed around the world.

The discovery of L. willardi and its description were made possible through modern scientific collection during collaborations between local Albertine Rift ornithologists and the Field Museum. Data from such modern collections will help clarify lingering concerns in the taxonomic community (particularly Birdlife International and the IUCN) in regards to the status of these two species relative to other black boubous occurring far to the west in the Cameroonian Highlands. Work like this has great value, because it allows highlighting issues of conservation concern at both regional and local scales. Each region of the Albertine Rift has its own history and ongoing issues with deforestation, instability and protection. There is no “one size fits all” solution to conservation in the Albertine Rift, but this paper helps emphasize that there is regional expertise in the form of researchers and conservation professionals who will make a difference. Opportunities to work with international colleagues to combine conservation and science, as in this paper, will be instrumental in building efforts to protect the incredible biota of this wonderful region.

AUTHOR BLOG: Count me in! I am available for detection at 6 AM on May 26th

Péter Sólymos

Linked paper: Evaluating time-removal models for estimating availability of boreal birds during point count surveys: Sample size requirements and model complexity by P.  Sólymos, S.M. Matsuoka, S.G. Cumming, D. Stralberg, P. Fontaine, F.K.A. Schmiegelow, S.J. Song, and E.M. Bayne, The Condor: Ornithological Applications 120:3, August 2018.

Point count survey duration rarely changes within projects but varies greatly among projects. As more and more large-scale studies are compiling and analyzing point count data from disparate sources, standardization becomes critical, because count duration greatly affects observations. The Boreal Avian Modelling (BAM, www.borealbirds.ca) project aims to further continental scale avian conservation through the integration and analysis of point count data collected across northern North America. In order to estimate population density and population size for landbird species, data integration became a real issue for us.

Two of the main sources of variation in the observed counts have nothing to do with ecological variables of interest, such as land cover and climate, but rather are considered nuisance variables. These are point count radius and point count duration. Recognizing that most studies do not follow survey protocol recommendations aimed to facilitate data integration (see e.g. Matsuoka et al. 2014), we opted to use model-based techniques to place our variable data on a common footing.

We first tackled standardizing for varying point count radii through distance sampling (Matsuoka et al. 2012) and eventually combined this with a removal model-based correction for varying point count duration. We named the method QPAD, referring to terms of our statistical notation: probability of detection (q), probability of availability (p), area surveyed (A) and population density (D) (Solymos et al. 2013). In the present paper we assessed different ways of controlling for point count duration. As the title indicates, we performed a cost-benefit analysis to make recommendations about when to use different types of the removal model.

We evaluated a conventional removal model and a finite mixture removal model, with and without covariates, for 152 bird species. We found that the probabilities of predicted availability under conventional and finite mixture models were very similar with respect to the range of probability values and the shape of the response curves to predictor variables. However, finite mixture models were better supported for the large majority of species. We also found overwhelming support for time-varying models irrespective of the parametrization.

So what is a finite mixture model? In our case, it splits the population of birds present at a location into frequent and infrequent singers. In previous parametrizations, researchers assumed that the singing rate of the infrequent group varies with date and time, whereas frequent singers remain frequent singers independent of time of year or time of day. We compared this to an alternate parametrization that assumes that individuals change behaviour over time and switch from frequent to infrequent singing behaviour—so it is the proportion of the two groups that varies. We found that the latter assumption was favoured.

Finite mixture models provide some really nice insight into how singing behaviour changes over time and, due to having more parameters, they provide a better fit and thus minimize bias in population size estimates. But all this improvement comes with a price: Sample size requirements (or more precisely, the number of detections required) are really high. To have all the benefits with reduced variance, one needs about 1000 non-zero observations to fit finite mixture models—20 times more than needed to reliably fit conventional removal models. This is much higher than previously suggested minimum sample sizes.

All of our findings indicate that lengthening the count duration from 3 minutes to 5-10 minutes is an important consideration when designing field surveys to increase the accuracy and precision of population estimates. Well-informed survey design, combined with various forms of removal sampling, is useful in accounting for availability bias in point counts, thereby improving population estimates and allowing for better integration of disparate studies at larger spatial scales. To this end, we provide our removal model estimates as part of the QPAD R package and the R functions required to fit all the above outlined removal models as part of the detect R package. We at the BAM project and our collaborators are already utilizing the removal model estimates to correct for availability bias in our continental and regional projects to inform better management and conservation of bird populations. Read more about these projects in our annual report.

A Better Way to Count Boreal Birds

CONDOR-18-32 C Kolaczan

Common Yellowthroats are among the birds for which new statistical models could provide better population estimates. Photo credit: C. Kolaczan

Knowing approximately how many individuals of a certain species are out there is important for bird conservation efforts, but raw data from bird surveys tends to underestimate bird abundance. The researchers behind a new paper from The Condor: Ornithological Applications tested a new statistical method to adjust for this and confirmed several mathematical tweaks that can produce better population estimates for species of conservation concern.

The University of Alberta’s Péter Sólymos and his colleagues tested a type of mathematical model called a “removal model” using bird count data for 152 species from the Boreal Avian Modelling Project, or BAM, which covers a vast area of Canada, Alaska, and the northeastern U.S. They found that incorporating variation in birds’ singing behavior improved models’ accuracy—how likely birds are to sing changes over the course of the day and the year, affecting how easy they are to detect. Extending the length of individual bird counts from three or five minutes to ten minutes was also beneficial.

“The chances of spotting something—a coin on the pavement, a bear in the mountains, or the apricot jam in the freezer—increases with effort,” explains Sólymos. “The more we walk, travel, look, or listen, the more things we find, but there is also a tradeoff between the number of places one can do a search and the length of the searches. Such decisions drive how long field biologists conduct bird counting at a given place. In our study, we looked at how the duration of counting influenced finding different bird species at different times of the day and the year. We also wanted to find the best way of how to standardize for different count durations and how to use these findings to provide better estimates of bird population sizes.”

This is more than just a math problem, however—accurate estimates of population size can be crucial for effective bird conservation, and many of the boreal bird species this study looked at are experiencing severe declines. This new approach offers a way to combine data from surveys that weren’t standardized in their design. “Population size of different species is one of the key metrics that affects their conservation importance, but estimating population size is a very challenging task that involves numerous assumptions,” says Sólymos. “Besides the ability to hopefully provide more accurate population size estimates, our modeling approach and findings can also help in timing of bird surveys to maximize the number of species detected.”

“While the authors of this study present the results of a rigorous comparison of modeling techniques to achieve better estimates of bird abundance from point counts, they also provide clear and simple recommendations on how and when to apply their findings to any study that expects to use time-interval point counts,” adds Jeff Wells, Science and Policy Director of the Boreal Songbird Initiative, who was not involved in the research. “This is a rich contribution not only to avian research methodology, but in the long run, also to bird conservation.”

Evaluating time-removal models for estimating availability of boreal birds during point count surveys: Sample size requirements and model complexity is available at http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1650/CONDOR-18-32.1.

About the journal: The Condor: Ornithological Applications is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology, published by the American Ornithological Society. For the past two years, The Condor has had the number one impact factor among 27 ornithology journals.

How Does Agriculture Affect Vulnerable Insect-Eating Birds?

CONDOR-18-16 C Michelson

Tree Swallow with prey. Photo credit: C. Michelson

Aerial insectivores—birds that hunt for insect prey on the wing—are declining across North America as agricultural intensification leads to diminishing insect abundance and diversity in many areas. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications looks at how Tree Swallows’ diets are affected by agriculture and finds that while birds living in cropland can still find their preferred prey, they may be working harder to get it.

The University of Saskatchewan’s Chantel Michelson, Robert Clark, and Christy Morrissey monitored Tree Swallow nest boxes at agricultural and grassland sites in 2012 and 2013, collecting blood samples from the birds to determine what they were eating via isotope ratios in their tissues. Tree Swallows usually prefer aquatic insects, which they capture in the air after they emerge from wetlands to complete their life cycles. The researchers suspected that birds living in crop-dominated areas would be forced to shift to eating more terrestrial insects, due to the effects of insecticide use and other agricultural practices on wetland habitat.

Instead, they found that swallows were eating more aquatic than terrestrial insects at all sites, and in 2012 it was actually the grassland birds whose diet contained a higher proportion of terrestrial insects. The results suggest that wetland habitat may provide a buffer against the negative effects of agriculture. However, birds living in cropland weighed less on average than their grassland-dwelling counterparts—a sign that they may be struggling.

“We set up this study to see if insectivorous swallows would be disadvantaged in agricultural croplands by shifting their normally aquatic diet to terrestrial insects to compensate for lower food availability. We were surprised that the birds did not generally do this,” says Morrissey. “Adult swallows in particular were heavily reliant on aquatic prey regardless of land use type. At the grassland dominated site, in fact, they fed their nestlings a wider variety of prey from both aquatic and terrestrial origin. Diet did not seem to influence body condition, but birds in cropland sites were lighter on average which may signal they are working harder in croplands to obtain their preferred aquatic prey. This work shows how important wetlands are for maintaining birds in agricultural landscapes and these are important reservoirs for conserving biodiversity in an otherwise heavily altered landscape.”

“Grasslands are one of the most imperiled ecosystems on the planet because their rich soils are ideal for agriculture. Pesticides and fertilizers are applied in ever-increasing quantities, which has serious implications for organisms that live there,” adds Acadia University’s Dave Shutler, an expert on Tree Swallow ecology who was not involved with the study. “This study compared the diets of Tree Swallows in natural grasslands and croplands, each of which had roughly similar wetland densities. Although diet composition was similar in both areas, it appears that diet quality was better in the natural grasslands, because birds there were heavier and in better condition than those in the cropland.”

Agricultural land cover does not affect diet of Tree Swallows in wetland dominated habitats is available at http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1650/CONDOR-18-16.1.

About the journal: The Condor: Ornithological Applications is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology, published by the American Ornithological Society. For the past two years, The Condor has had the number one impact factor among 27 ornithology journals.

Woodpeckers and Development Coexist in Seattle

CONDOR-17-171 J Tomasevic

Pileated Woodpeckers peek from a tree cavity. Photo credit: J. Tomasevic

The two largest woodpeckers in North America, the Imperial Woodpecker and Ivory-billed Woodpecker, are believed to have gone extinct during the twentieth century. Can their surviving cousin, the Pileated Woodpecker, persist when standing dead trees and other crucial resources are lost to urbanization? A new study published by The Condor: Ornithological Applications tracked birds in suburban Seattle and found that as long as tree cover remains above a certain threshold, Pileated Woodpeckers and housing developments can coexist.

The University of Washington’s Jorge Tomasevic (now at the Universidad Austral de Chile) and John Marzluff trapped and radio-tagged 16 Pileated Woodpeckers at 9 sites with varying degrees of urbanization in suburban Seattle. Tracking each bird for about a year, they found that Pileated Woodpeckers used not only forested areas such as parks, but also lightly and moderately urbanized areas where some trees had been retained, taking advantage of resources such as backyard birdfeeders.

These results show that retaining at least 20% forest cover, including standing dead trees, over large suburban areas may help sustain Pileated Woodpeckers and perhaps even other species tied to them. Despite potential risks from threats such as feral cats and collisions with windows, the researchers believe that cities can play an important role in the conservation of biodiversity.

“You’d think that such large bird would be easy to find, especially when carrying a transmitter, but they did a very good job hiding,” says Tomasevic. “It was also very challenging to work in populated areas. I have so many anecdotes, good and bad, about dealing with people and people dealing with me doing my work. Some people were very friendly, but some were a little nervous with me walking around the neighborhood. I tried to look as official as possible, with University of Washington logos on my jacket, and I created a website for the project and printed some business cards. It was a great opportunity to do outreach, and I’m still friends with some of the neighborhood residents.”

“As suburban sprawl becomes more and more ubiquitous, it’s imperative that we consider which specific yard features can be promoted to share our neighborhoods with wildlife,” according to the University of Delaware’s Desiree Narango, an expert on avian urban ecology. “This paper is a nice example showing that even a mature forest specialist can use and navigate the suburban landscape if we provide the resources they need: large trees and some retained wooded areas.”

Use of suburban landscapes by the Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) is available at http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1650/CONDOR-17-171.1.

About the journal: The Condor: Ornithological Applications is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology, published by the American Ornithological Society. For the past two years, The Condor has had the number one impact factor among 27 ornithology journals.